Harvard Bibliography Generator Image

To cite an online image you are discussing in your writing

In the text

Mention the image in the text and cite the author and date:

The cartoon by Frith (1968) describes ...

If the image has no named author, cite the full name and date of the image:

The map shows the Parish of Maroota during the 1840s (Map of the Parish of Maroota, County of Cumberland, District of Windsor 1840-1849)

List of references

Frith J 1968, From the rich man’s table, political cartoon by John Frith, Old Parliament House, Canberra, accessed 11 May 2007, .

Include the following information:

  • author (if available)
  • year produced (if available)
  • title of image (or a description)
  • Format and any details (if applicable)
  • name and place of the sponsor of the source
  • accessed day month year (the date you viewed/ downloaded the image)
  • URL or Internet address (between pointed brackets)

If there is no named author, put the image title first, followed by the date (if available):

Khafre pyramid from Khufu’s quarry 2007, digital photograph, Ancient Egypt Research Associates, accessed 2 August 2007, .

Map of the Parish of Maroota, County of Cumberland, District of Windsor 1840-1849, digital image of cartographic material, National Library of Australia, accessed 13 April 2007, .

To cite online images/ diagrams used as figures

Figures include diagrams, graphs, sketches, photographs and maps. If you are writing a report or an assignment where you include any visuals as figures, you must include a reference.

If you include figures in your work, they should be numbered and labelled with captions. Captions should be very simple and descriptive and be followed by an in-text citation. Figure captions should be directly under the image.

In the text of the assignment

Cite the author and year:

Figure 1: Questions the Literature Review can Answer (The Learning Centre 2007) 

In the list of references

Provide full citation information:

The Learning Centre 2007, Some of the questions a review of the literature can answer, digital image, The University of New South Wales, accessed 2 August 2007, .

To cite online data in a table caption

If you reproduce or adapt table data found online you must include a citation. All tables should be numbered and table captions should be above the table.

In the text of the assignment

Table 2: Agricultural water use, by state 2004-05 (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006)

 

StateTotal ML
NSW (including Canberra)3 976 108
Vic.2 570 219
Qld2 864 889
SA1 004 828
WA429 372
Tas255 448
NT45 638
Total ML11 146 502

List of references

Include the name of the web page where the table data is found.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006, Water Use on Australian Farms, 2004-05, Cat. no. 4618.0, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra, accessed 4 July 2007 .


 

 Next: FAQ and troubleshooting

Why do I Need to Cite?

Harvard referencing can be a confusing task, especially if you are new to the concept, but it’s absolutely essential. In fact, accurate and complete referencing can mean the difference between reaching your academic goals and damaging your reputation amongst scholars. Simply put - referencing is the citing of sources you have utilised to support your essay, research, conference or article etc.

Even if you are using our Harvard style citation generator, understanding why you need to cite will go a long way in helping you to naturally integrate the process into your research and writing routine.

Firstly, whenever another source contributes to your work you must give the original author the appropriate credit in order to avoid plagiarism, even when you have completely reworded the information. The only exception to this rule is common knowledge - e.g. Barack Obama is President of the United States. Whilst plagiarism is not always intentional, it is easy to accidentally plagiarize your work when you are under pressure from imminent deadlines, you have managed your time ineffectively, or if you lack confidence when putting ideas into your own words. The consequences can be severe; deduction of marks at best, expulsion from college or legal action from the original author at worst. Find out more here.

This may sound overwhelming, but plagiarism can be easily avoided by using our Harvard citation generator and carrying out your research and written work thoughtfully and responsibly. We have compiled a handy checklist to follow whilst you are working on an assignment.

How to avoid plagiarism:


  • Formulate a detailed plan - carefully outline both the relevant content you need to include, as well as how you plan on structuring your work

  • Keep track of your sources - record all of the relevant publication information as you go (e.g. If you are citing a book you should note the author or editor’s name(s), year of publication, title, edition number, city of publication and name of publisher). Carefully save each quote, word-for-word, and place it in inverted commas to differentiate it from your own words. Tired of interrupting your workflow to cite? Use our Harvard referencing generator to automate the process

  • Manage your time effectively - make use of time plans and targets, and give yourself enough time to read, write and proofread

  • When you are paraphrasing information, make sure that you use only your own words and a sentence structure that differs from the original text

  • Save all of your research and citations in a safe place - organise and manage your Harvard style citations.

If you carefully check your college or publisher’s advice and guidelines on citing and stick to this checklist, you should be confident that you will not be accused of plagiarism.

Secondly, proving that your writing is informed by appropriate academic reading will enhance your work’s authenticity. Academic writing values original thought that analyzes and builds upon the ideas of other scholars. It is therefore important to use Harvard style referencing to accurately signpost where you have used someone else’s ideas in order to show that your writing is based on knowledge and informed by appropriate academic reading. Citing your sources will demonstrate to your reader that you have delved deeply into your chosen topic and supported your thesis with expert opinions.

Here at Cite This For Me we understand how precious your time is, which is why we created our Harvard citation generator and guide to help relieve the unnecessary stress of citing. Escape assignment-hell and give yourself more time to focus on the content of your work by using Cite This For Me citation management tool.

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