Modern Chemistry Chapter 5 Homework 5-2 Answers

COURSE DESCRIPTION:For students desiring an introduction to chemistry or requiring a course to update their knowledge of chemistry. Fundamentals stressed are atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, molecular structure, solutions, acids and bases, chemical nomenclature, and stoichiometry. This course is offered six periods per cycle. Each cycle students will meet for a double laboratory period as well as four regular classroom periods. The laboratory period is used to give students hands-on experience with various pieces of chemistry equipment and to solidify concepts covered in class. Students will be required to complete weekly laboratory reports on their experimental findings.

PREREQUISITES: Students should be taking or should have taken Algebra II for this course. Students should have received a grade of “B” or better in Biology. Outside study and work are essential to successfully complete this course.

 

TEXTBOOK INFORMATION/IMPORTANT LINKS & FORMS:

Scientific Method/Lab Report Writing Prezi

 


Week of
 Chapter/Reading(s) Assignment(s)/Handouts Lab(s)  

 Notes          

Video Links
8/21-8/28

Chapter 1 and 2--Chemical World and Measurement

 

Lab Safety/Equipment  

Syllabus and Lab Safety Contract due 8/25

 

5 Interesting Facts about an Element

 

Chapter 1--Chemistry and The Scientific MethodWhat is chemistry?

 

What is science?

 

What is matter? 

 

Lab Safety Rap 

8/29-9/7

Chapter 1 and 2--Chemical World and Measurement

 

Lab Safety/Equipment  

Lab Safety and Equipment Quiz-8/30

 

SI Unit Conversions Chart  

 

 

Metric Measurement Lab 

 

Accuracy and Precision Lab 

 

Lab Equipment Review and Measurement Review 

Chapter 1--Chemistry and The Scientific Method

 

Chapter 2--Measurement and Problem Solving

 

 

Watch Iodine Clock video

9/8-9/18

Chapter 1 and 2--Chemical World and Measurement

 

The Scientific Method and SI Measurement

 

Density Lab

 

Writing Science Lab Reports

 

 

 

Chapter 1--Chemistry and The Scientific Method

 

Chapter 2--Measurement and Problem Solving 

Big Bang Theory Using The Scientific Method

 

Egg in a Bottle Trick

and

Explanation

 

 

Water Worm: How does it work?

 

Variables 

9/19-9/26

Chapter 1 and 2--Chemical World and Measurement

 

Measurement and Problem Solving in Chemistry 

Midpoint of MP-9/22

                                            

Critique Handout

 

Percent Error of M&Ms Lab 

Chapter 1--Chemistry and The Scientific Method

 

Chapter 2--Measurement and Problem Solving

Scientific Notation

 

9/27-10/4

Chapter 1 and 2--Chemical World and Measurement

 

Measurement and Problem Solving in Chemistry 

 

 

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy (in book; Chapter 1 Section 2) 

September critique due by 9/30 

 

Quiz on Introduction to Chemistry & Measurement on 9/29

 

 

 

Significant Figures Lab

Chapter 1--Chemistry and The Scientific Method

 

Chapter 2--Measurement and Problem Solving

 

 

Unit Conversions and Significant Figures 

 

 

 

10/5-10/13

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy (in book; Chapter 1 Section 2)

 

From Stations Activity:

Density Challenge Problems

 

Significant Figures Calculations WS 

 

Physical and Chemical Changes and Properties WS 

 

Classifying Matter WS 

Chemical & Physical Changes Lab

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy 

 

What is matter? 

 

Types of Mixtures Video

 

Physical and Chemical Changes

10/16-10/23Chapter 3--Matter and Energy (in book; Chapter 1 Section 2)

 

Quiz on Density and Significant Figures 10/19

 

Physical and Chemical Changes and Properties WS 

 

Happy Mole Day on 10/23!

Evidence for Chemical Change Lab 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy 

Chemical vs Physical Properties--Explained

 

Chemical vs Physical Changes-Explained

 

Intensive vs. Extensive Porperties--Explained

  

What is a Mole? 

10/24-10/31Chapter 3--Matter and Energy (in book; Chapter 1 Section 2)

End of 1st Marking Period 10/25

 

October critique due by 10/31 

 

Classification of Matter Activity 

Classification of Matter Activity 

 

 

 

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy

 

11/1-11/8

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy (in book; Chapter 1 Section 2)

 

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

    Chapter 3/Section    1&2 (in book) 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3--Matter and Energy

 

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements 

Carbon Snake-Dehydration of Sucrose

 

Antoine Lavoisier-Conservation of Mass

11/9-11/16

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

    Chapter 3/Section    1&2 (in book) 

Quiz on Specific Heat and Energy on 11/14

Atomic Model Webquest

 

 

 

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements 

 

Just How Small is an Atom?

 

What Does an Atom Look Like?

 

11/17-12/4

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

    Chapter 3/Sections    1-3 (in book) &    Chapter 5/Sections    1&2

 

November critique due 11/30

 

Midpoint of 2nd MP-12/4

 

Atomic Model Foldable and Atom Questions

Isotopes Lab

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements
12/5-12/12

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

    Chapter 3/Sections    1-3 (in book) &    Chapter 5/Sections    1&2

 

Quiz on Atomic Models and Theory 12/6

 

Average Mass of Humans WS 

 

 

Introduction to the Periodic Table Activity

 

 

 

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements 

The Periodic Table

 

Alkali Metals in Water

 

Meet the Elements Song

12/13-12/20

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

    Chapter 3/Sections    1-3 (in book) &    Chapter 5/Sections    1&2

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book)  

Quiz on Isotopes and Atomic Mass 12/15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4--Atoms and Elements

 

 


 

Law of Constant Composition

12/21-1/5

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book)  

 

Happy Holidays!

December critique due by 12/31

 

MIDTERM EXAMS-1/4-1/9*

 

 

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes 

 

 

1/8-1/16

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book) 

End of 1st Semester/2nd Marking Period-1/12 

 

Quiz on Periodic Law and Families of Periodic Table-1/11

 

Nomenclature Pretest-1/11

 

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

 

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes 

 

 

 

 

Naming Chemical Compounds

 

Writing Formulas for Chemical Compounds 

 

Naming Acids 

1/17-1/24

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book) 

 

 

Law of Definite Proportions WS 

 

 

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds 

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes

 

 

 

1/25-2/1

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book) 

January critique due 1/31

 

Quiz on Naming Ionic 2/2

 

Naming Compounds and Formula Writing Activity

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds 

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes

Naming Chemical Compounds

 

Writing Formulas for Chemical Compounds 

2/2-2/9Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds

    Chapter 7 (in     book) 

 

 

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds 

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes

Chapter 6-Chemical Bonding 

Atomic Hookups--Chemical Bonding

 

Polar and Nonpolar Bonds

 

Bonding and Lewis Structures

2/12-2/20

Chapter 6--Chemical Bonding

   Chapter 6 in book

 

 

 

Midpoint of 3rd MP-2/14

 

Quiz on Naming Molecular Ionic (Stock System), and Acids 2/14

 

Nomenclature Post-Test 2/19 or 2/20 (see links above for online reviews)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5--Molecules and Compounds 

 

Nomenclature Booklet Notes

 

Chapter 6-Chemical Bonding 

 

 

 

 

The Electron

 

Flame Tests Lab Results

 

2/21-3/1

Chapter 6--Chemical Bonding

   Chapter 6 in book 

Molecular Structures Lab

Chapter 6-Chemical Bonding 

 

Electron Configuration Part 1

 

Electron Configuration Part 2 

 

Orbital Notation  

3/2-3/9

Chapter 6--Chemical Bonding

   Chapter 6 in book 

 

Lewis Structures Online Review 

 

More Lewis Structures Online Review 

 

Building Molecular Compounds Online Review

 

Chapter 6-Chemical Bonding 

 

 

 
      
   

Chemical Bonds Lab

Flame Test Lab

 

Electron Configuration and Orbital Notation Lab

  
      
 

Chapter 7--Electrons in the Atom and The Periodic Table

   Chapter 4&5 in    book 

 

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

   Chapter 3 (section    3) and Chapter 7    (section 3) in book

 

 

Magnesium Oxide Lab

Chapter 7--Electrons in Atoms and The Periodic Table

 

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition 

What is a Mole?

 

How Big is a Mole? 

 
 

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

   Chapter 3 (section    3) and Chapter 7    (section 3) in book

 

End of 3rd Marking Period

 

March Critique due by

 

Atoms, Mass, and the Mole WS  

Copper Sulfide Lab

Dimensional Analysis Notes and Examples

 

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

Understanding Conversion Factors 

4/3-4/13

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

   Chapter 3 (section    3) and Chapter 7    (section 3) in book

 

Quiz on Atoms, Mass and Mole Calculations 4/7

 

Mole Conversions Online Review

 

Water of Crystallization and Formula of a Hydrate Lab (BaCl2)

 

 

Water of Crystallization and Formula of a Hydrate Lab (CuSO4) 

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

How to Calculate Empirical and Molecular Formulas and Percent Composition

 

Percent Composition and Empirical Formula 

4/17-4/25

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

   Chapter 3 (section    3) and Chapter 7    (section 3) in book

Types of Reactions Lab

Chapter 8--Chemical Composition

 

Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions 

 
4/26-5/3

Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions

   Chapter 8 in book 

 

April Critique due 4/30

 

Balancing Equations WS

 

Precipitation Lab

 

Solubility Rules 

Chapter 9--Chemical ReactionsAn Introduction to Balancing Chemical Equations
5/4-5/11

Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions

   Chapter 8 in book

 

Midpoint of 4th MP-5/8 

 

Quiz on Chemical Reactions, Types of Reactions & Predicting Products on 5/9

 

 

Balancing Equations Online Practice #2 

 

Balancing Reactions Self-Check

 

Types of Reactions Online Practice 

 

Predicting Products Online Practice  

Vinegar and Baking Soda Stoichiometry Lab Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions 
5/15-5/22

Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions

   Chapter 8 in book

 

 

Chapter 10--Quantities in Chemical Reactions

   Chapter 9 in book 

 

Chapter 10 Learning Map

 

Mole Lab--Iron Filings

 

Chapter 9--Chemical Reactions

 

Chapter 10--Quantities in Chemical Reactions  

Stochiometry: Chemistry for Massive Creatures

 

5/23-5/31

Chapter 10--Quantities in Chemical Reactions

   Chapter 9 in book 

 

May Critique due 5/31 

 

Seniors Final Exam 5/26

Final Exam Online Reviews  

 

S'Mores Lab   

 

Limiting Reactant & Percent Yield Worksheet 

 

 

 

Limiting Reactant and Percent Yield Lab

Chapter 10--Quantities in Chemical Reactions 

 

Introduction to Limiting and Excess Reactants 

6/1-6/9

FINAL EXAM PREP

 

Interesting Facts about the Elements 

 

 

Quiz on Stoichiometry 5/2

 

Final Exams

Period 1: 6/6

Period 5: 6/6

Period 4: 6/9 

 

 

Final Exam Online Reviews  

 

 

   
      
 

 

    
  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  

Extra Labs: 

Molecular Polarities PHeT Lab

Halide Ions Lab 

Trends in the Periodic Table Activity 

Electron Probability Lab 

Extra Notes:

Determining Molecular Polarity Link

Periodic Trends Blog/Notes 

Periodic Table Notes (Chapter 5) 

Extra Videos:

Intermolecular Forces

The Electron and Periodic Trends 

Periodic Trends 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scientific Method/Lab Report Writing Prezi

 


Presentation on theme: "** MAJOR PART FOR CH. 5 Chapter menu Resources"— Presentation transcript:

1 ** MAJOR PART FOR CH. 5 Chapter menu Resources
B.8.C.1 Determine ion formation tendencies for groups on the Periodic Table:􀁸 main group elements􀁸 transition elementsChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

2 Pick up computer and log-in as you start opener.
OPENER #10 - FRI - Nov. 8, 2013 (B day) AND Mon - Nov. 11, 2013 (A Day)Pick up computer and log-in as you start opener.1. Write the noble gas e- configuration for Phosphorus, P.2. What is the greatest outer energy sublevel for Chlorine, Cl?3. Draw the orbital notation for Vanadium, V (atomic #23).I NEED ALL LABS TODAY!CW: NotesCW: Periodic Table Puzzle Puzzle ActivityCW/HW: Chapter 4 review questions pg #1, 3- 11, 13-41, (1-41 except #2 & 12) due by Tuesday (B day) and Wed (A Day).TEST - TUESDAY ch. 4 - B Day - WED. A Day - Make an A!Retake Element-Symbol Test before Thanksgiving!Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

3 Energy Level Order - lowest to highest 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, 5p, 6s, etc.
Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

4 ASSIGNMENTS - FRI and MON 11-8 and 11-11-13
Homework:Chapter 4 review questions pg #1, 3-11, 13-41, (1-41 except #2 & 12) due by Tuesday (B day) and Wed (A Day).Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

5 Chapter 5 Table of Contents Section 1 History of the Periodic Table
The Periodic LawChapter 5Table of ContentsSection 1 History of the Periodic TableSection 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic TableSection 3 Electron Configuration and PeriodicPropertiesChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

6 Chapter 5 Lesson Starter
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Lesson StarterShare what you have learned previously about the periodic table.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

7 Section 1 History of the Periodic Table
Chapter 5ObjectivesExplain the roles of Mendeleev and Moseley in the development of the periodic table.Describe the modern periodic table.Explain how the periodic law can be used to predict the physical and chemical properties of elements.Describe how the elements belonging to a group of the periodic table are interrelated in terms of atomic number.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

8 Organizing the Elements
5.1In a self-service store, the products are grouped according to similar characteristics. With a logical classification system, finding and comparing products is easy. You will learn how elements are arranged in the periodic table and what that arrangement reveals about the elements.Slideof 288End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

9 Searching For an Organizing Principle
5.1Organizing the Elements>Searching For an Organizing PrincipleSearching For an Organizing PrincipleHow did chemists begin to organize the known elements?Slideof 289End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

10 Searching For an Organizing Principle
5.1Organizing the Elements>Searching For an Organizing PrincipleChemists used the properties of elements to sort them into groups.Slideof 2810End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

11 Searching For an Organizing Principle
5.1Organizing the Elements>Searching For an Organizing PrincipleChlorine, bromine, and iodine have very similar chemical properties.Chlorine, bromine, and iodine have very similar chemical properties. The numbers shown are the average atomic masses for these elements.Slideof 2811End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

12 Mendeleev’s Periodic Table
5.1Organizing the Elements>Mendeleev’s Periodic TableMendeleev’s Periodic TableHow did Mendeleev organize his periodic table?Slideof 2812End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

13 Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Mendeleev and Chemical PeriodicityMendeleev noticed that when the elements were arranged in order of increasing atomic mass, certain similarities in their chemical properties appeared at regular intervals.Repeating patterns are referred to as periodic.Mendeleev created a table in which elements with similar properties were grouped together—a periodic table of the elements.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

14 Mendeleev’s Periodic Table
5.1Organizing the Elements>Mendeleev’s Periodic TableAn Early Version of Mendeleev’s Periodic TableIn this early version of Mendeleev’s periodic table, the rows contain elements with similar properties. Observing A fourth element is grouped with chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), and (I) iodine. What is this element’s symbol?Slideof 2814End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

15 Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity, continued
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity, continuedAfter Mendeleev placed all the known elements in his periodic table, several empty spaces were left.In 1871 Mendeleev predicted the existence and properties of elements that would fill three of the spaces.By 1886, all three of these elements had been discovered.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

16 Properties of Some Elements Predicted By Mendeleev
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Properties of Some Elements Predicted By MendeleevChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

17 Moseley and the Periodic Law
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Moseley and the Periodic LawIn 1911, the English scientist Henry Moseley discovered that the elements fit into patterns better when they were arranged according to atomic number, rather than atomic weight.The Periodic Law states that the physical and chemical properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic numbers.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

18 6.1Organizing the Elements>The Periodic LawThe periodic law: When elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number, there is a periodic repetition of their physical and chemical properties.The properties of the elements within a period change as you move across a period from left to right.The pattern of properties within a period repeats as you move from one period to the next.Slideof 2818End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

19 Periodicity of Atomic Numbers
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5Periodicity of Atomic NumbersChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

20 The Modern Periodic Table
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5The Modern Periodic TableThe Periodic Table is an arrangement of the elements in order of their atomic numbers so that elements with similar properties fall in the same column, or group.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

21 Periodic Table Overview
Visual ConceptsChapter 5Periodic Table OverviewClick below to watch the Visual Concept.Visual ConceptChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

22 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsWhat are three broad classes of elements?Slideof 2822End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

23 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
6.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsThree classes of elements are metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.Across a period, the properties of elements become less metallic and more nonmetallic.Slideof 2823End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

24 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetals, Metalloids, and Nonmetals in the Periodic TableOne way to classify elements in the periodic table is as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids. Inferring What is the purpose for the black stair-step line?Slideof 2824End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

25 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetals, Metalloids, and Nonmetals in the Periodic TableOne way to classify elements in the periodic table is as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids. Inferring What is the purpose for the black stair-step line?Slideof 2825End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

26 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetals, Metalloids, and Nonmetals in the Periodic TableOne way to classify elements in the periodic table is as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids. Inferring What is the purpose for the black stair-step line?Slideof 2826End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

27 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetals, Metalloids, and Nonmetals in the Periodic TableOne way to classify elements in the periodic table is as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids. Inferring What is the purpose for the black stair-step line?Slideof 2827End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

28 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetalsMetals are good conductors of heat and electric current.80% of elements are metals.Metals have a high luster, are ductile, and are malleable.Slideof 2828End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

29 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsUses of Iron, Copper, and AluminumThe metals iron, copper, and aluminum have many important uses. How each metal is used is determined by its properties.Slideof 2829End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

30 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsUses of Iron, Copper, and AluminumThe metals iron, copper, and aluminum have many important uses. How each metal is used is determined by its properties.Slideof 2830End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

31 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsUses of Iron, Copper, and AluminumThe metals iron, copper, and aluminum have many important uses. How each metal is used is determined by its properties.Slideof 2831End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

32 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsNonmetalsIn general, nonmetals are poor conductors of heat and electric current.Most nonmetals are gases at room temperature.A few nonmetals are solids, such as sulfur and phosphorus.One nonmetal, bromine, is a dark-red liquid.Slideof 2832End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

33 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsMetalloidsA metalloid generally has properties that are similar to those of metals and nonmetals.The behavior of a metalloid can be controlled by changing conditions.Slideof 2833End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

34 Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
5.1Organizing the Elements>Metals, Nonmetals, and MetalloidsIf a small amount of boron is mixed with silicon, the mixture is a good conductor of electric current. Silicon can be cut into wafers, and used to make computer chips.Slideof 2834End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

35 The Modern Periodic Table
Section 1 History of the Periodic TableChapter 5The Modern Periodic TableRamsay discovered group 18 or 8A which are known as the noble gases. These were more difficult to discover because they are mostly nonreactive.The lanthanides are the 14 elements from atomic numbers 58 (cerium, Ce) to 71 (lutetium, Lu).The actinides are the 14 elements from atomic numbers 90 (thorium, Th) to 103 (lawrencium, Lr).Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

36 Assess students’ understanding of the concepts in Section 5.1
Section AssessmentAssess students’ understanding of the concepts in Section5.1Continue to: Launch:-or-Section QuizSlideof 28End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

37 1. The modern periodic table has elements arranged in order of colors.
5.1 Section Quiz1. The modern periodic table has elements arranged in order ofcolors.melting and boiling points.increasing atomic mass.increasing atomic number.Slideof 28End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

38 5.1 Section Quiz2. Mendeleev arranged the elements in his periodic table in order of increasingatomic number.number of protons.number of electrons.atomic massSlideof 28End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

39 3. Which one of the following is NOT a general property of metals?
5.1 Section Quiz3. Which one of the following is NOT a general property of metals?ductilitymalleabilityhaving a high lusterpoor conductor of heat and electricitySlideof 28End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

40 Online Self-Check Quiz
Complete the online Quiz and record answers. Ask if you have any questions about your answers.click here for online Quiz 5.1(8 questions)You must be in the “Play mode” for the slideshow for hyperlink to work.Slideof 25End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

41 VIDEOS FOR ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTION
Additional Videos for Section 5.1: History of the Periodic TablePeriodic Table Overview (4:31)Noble Gases (2:43)Slideof 28End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

42 Chapter 5 Lesson Starter
Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic TableChapter 5Lesson StarterName as many properties shared by elements of the same group in the periodic table as possible.Describe what you already know about an element just by looking at its position in the periodic table.Identify any noticeable trends.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

43 Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic Table
Chapter 5ObjectivesExplain the relationship between electrons in sublevels and the length of each period of the periodic table.Locate and name the four blocks of the periodic table. Explain the reasons for these names.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

44 Chapter 5 Objectives, continued
Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic TableChapter 5Objectives, continuedDiscuss the relationship between group configurations and group numbers.Describe the locations in the periodic table and the general properties of the alkali metals, the alkaline-earth metals, the halogens, and the noble gases.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

45 Periods and Blocks of the Periodic Table
Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic TableChapter 5Periods and Blocks of the Periodic TableElements are also organized horizontally in rows, or periods. The period of an element can be determined by the element’s highest energy level.Ex. As has the following noble gas electron configuration[Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p3 ➯ highest energy level is 4th energy level.Elements are arranged vertically in the periodic table in groups (also called families) that share similar chemical properties.The length of each period is determined by the number of electrons that can occupy the sublevels being filled in that period.The periodic table is divided into four blocks, the s, p, d, and f blocks. The name of each block is determined by the electron sublevel being filled in that block.Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

46 Relating Period Length and Sublevels Filled
Visual ConceptsChapter 5Relating Period Length and Sublevels FilledClick below to watch the Visual Concept.Visual ConceptChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

47 Blocks of the Periodic Table Based on Sublevel
Visual ConceptsChapter 5Blocks of the Periodic Table Based on SublevelClick below to watch the Visual Concept.Visual ConceptChapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

48 Chapter 5 Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic Table
Chapter menuResourcesCopyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

49 Squares in the Periodic Table
6.2Classifying the Elements>Squares in the Periodic TableIn this periodic table, the colors of the boxes are used to classify representative elements and transition elements.Slideof 2849End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

50 Blocks of Elements 5.2 > Classifying the Elements
Transition ElementsBlocks of ElementsThis diagram classifies elements into blocks according to sublevels that are filled or filling with electrons. Interpreting Diagrams In the highest occupied energy level of a halogen atom, how many electrons are in the p sublevel?Slideof 2850End Show© Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall

51 Periods and Blocks of the Periodic Table, continued
Section 2 Electron Configuration and the Periodic TableChapter 5

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